Updating blackberry os through bes


Those aren’t the guys you’re going to bend over backwards to hire to frame your walls.The whole story seems to be built on the premise that the only skill a carpenter has is the ability to drive a nail straight, making any notion of an “interview” farcical. There’s a hell of a difference between a framer, a cabinet-maker, and a furniture-maker. There is, however, a lot of brown stain, and brown shingling, and brown brick. Questions like this are exactly how a good interviewer separates a blinkered newbie from an expert with perspective.If a programmer walked into an interview and gave answers this evasive about how many projects he’d done in Java, he’d be an obvious no-hire.Not having certain experience is one thing; not even knowing what experience you have is another matter entirely.If learning this stuff is so easy, then I’d rather hire someone who understands what the goal is of finish carpentry.



The punchline is that the interviewer hires a car salesman who’d sold brown cars with walnut interiors. Our hypothetical carpenter was effectively arguing that even if he’d only ever hammered together pine stud walls he could easily learn to do finish carpentry with walnut for a client very particular about his browns.Pouting that interviews suck without suggesting any improvements is just childish, and doubly so if you’re complaining not about the bizarre “puzzle question” or “culture fit” interviews, but about being questioned on knowledge and experience.Technical interviews can be annoying and they can be done badly, but I’d still much rather work in an industry that does tech interviews than one forced to rely solely on CV reviews and personality-driven poking at “soft skills”.In this hypothetical, we’re talking about a job building houses. Any real carpenter would know the differences between varieties of wood, between the two major types of wood construction, and between the different roles wood can play in a project.

Houses are most commonly built using platform framing of stud walls made from spruce, pine, or fir. And he’d definitely know which projects he’d worked on that involved which.

(Returning the first point, I suppose the implication is that driving a nail is the fizzbuzz of carpentry.) Let’s just cover the first few questions: If the only way you can describe your work is “I’m a programmer. Yes it would be friendlier if the interviewer led a bit with “What kind of work have you been doing? As an interviewer I’m open to the idea that someone good at any one of these probably has great potential for any of the others, but if you’ve got nothing more to say about your career than that you’ve done general things in a general sort of way, you can’t exactly blame me for taking my own direction on what details I’m going to dig into. And all those kinds of brown would seem to be of major interest to a carpenter: if something is being stained instead of painted then I’d think that would affect the choice of wood. If you’re building a software library that will be called by a UI, then responsiveness matters.